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Filter: Cedar Street Courtyard
 

10:00am

Great British Breakfast
 
 

11:00am

Filter Magazine's Showdown at Cedar Street
 
 

11:00am

Filter Magazine's Showdown at Cedar Street

11:00am

Filter’s Showdown at Cedar St.

8:00pm

Madi Diaz
    Thursday March 15, 2012 8:00pm - 8:40pm @ Cedar Street Courtyard (208 W 4th St)

    “When I was a teenager,” Madi Diaz recalls, “my dad and I would hang out in the living room and learn songs by bands like the Eagles and Alice in Chains. We’d pick parts to harmonize and sing our way through them, over and over. My dad would get so excited when he figured out something by Yes or the Mamas and Papas, then he’d let me pick my favorite Silverchair song or whatever I was obsessing over at the moment and we’d learn it together, too. It was the best.”
    Diaz’s advance EP, Far From Things That We Know, and forthcoming full-length, Plastic Moon (out January 24), are her first releases with the newly launched tinyOGRE Entertainment. The music reflects a lifelong attraction to song craft as well her deep-rooted affinity for contrasting types of music. One part pop music and one part organic Americana, the album is a hooky, confident collection of songs that is as heartbreaking in places as it is catchy in others, sometimes within the span of a single song.
    The 25-year-old, Nashville-based musician is herself a bit of a contrast, growing up in Lancaster, PA, surrounded by Amish farms, where she was home schooled by her Peruvian mother, Nancy, a proponent of early childhood development and the visual arts, and her Danish father, Eric, a woodworker and musician. Madi began piano lessons at age five at the behest of her father, himself a keyboard player in the Frank Zappa tribute band, Project Object. The family’s home stereo fed her a steady diet of Metallica, Sheryl Crow, The Beatles and Whitney Houston.
    In her early teens, Diaz switched from piano to guitar and when she sought advanced instruction, she landed at School of Rock in Philadelphia. Her family eventually moved to the city and both Eric and Madi’s brother, Max, went on to become part of the faculty.
    “The school was a big part of my life,” she acknowledges. “It showed me how to be in a band, and taught me about dynamics and orchestration, taking apart sections and basically leading and directing other musicians. I’m definitely opinionated and I was always the one to come into a room where everyone’s doing what they want and try to get them organized.”
    Diaz was a standout among the pupils and became a focal point of director Don Argott’s 2005 documentary about the program, Rock School. Nearly a decade later, she holds a fondness for the fierce teenage Madi captured on screen, but doesn’t plan to see the movie again any time soon. “It’s embarrassing enough to have pictures of you when you’re 15 or 16 years old; I have an entire doc.”
    After high school, Diaz was accepted to Berklee College of Music in Boston and began spending every waking moment making music: writing, singing and recording. She credits the period with helping her get serious about pursuing music as a career.
    “It was one of the smarter things I’ve done,” she says. “It made me focus on finding what I wanted to do. It helped me realize I didn’t want to work in production; that’s not my brain. Do I want to work in film scoring? No, not that either. I came to recognize that I liked songwriting the most.”
    A fellow student’s production assignment provided the first opportunity to work with Kyle Ryan. The Lincoln, Nebraska-raised guitarist would turn into her future songwriting collaborator and right-hand man. Diaz was in awe of his guitar playing, and Ryan had similar admiration for Diaz’s abilities, yet the two cagily circled each other for a time. Diaz was convinced Ryan was just being nice when he gave her his number and asked her to write together, while Ryan was sure Diaz hated his guitar playing, which was why she wasn’t calling.
    “We were kind of awkward to each other around campus for a while,” she says. “Turns out we were both just completely intimidated.”
    The ice was broken when that fellow student, a producer looking for a project, offered Diaz the chance to record an album in Hawaii—all expenses paid, no strings attached. It was a no-brainer for Madi and she worked up the courage to ask her favorite guitar player on campus to come along as part of the band. The self-released, alt.country-leaning Skin And Bones was the result, and a songwriting and performing partnership between Diaz and Ryan was struck for good, as well as a friendship.
    “I was going through a lot of weird stuff personally at the time,” she reflects. “My parents had recently divorced. I was going out with shitty boyfriends. My brother was still living at home and having a hard time. But Kyle was really great. He’d come over to my apartment and we’d write and talk for hours. It was super helpful and I’m still grateful for it.”
    Not long after that, Diaz tired of Berklee and subsequently left the program. She and Ryan kept writing though, and, armed with a strong batch of new material, the pair began heading down to New York City regularly for gigs. One otherwise inauspicious night at Greenwich Village landmark The Bitter End led to a chance meeting with a manager who had come to see another artist and stayed when she heard Diaz’s voice. The manager left her card, and soon thereafter she began representing Madi. Their first order of business turned out to be sending Diaz and Ryan for a month-long visit to Nashville to do some co-writing.
    The trip went so swimmingly that Diaz and Ryan relocated to Music City in mid-2010. “When we moved to Nashville it was like clouds lifted off our heads,” she says. The pair was quickly thrust into the center of the city’s nascent indie-pop scene, eventually landing Madi on the Ten Out Of Tenn tour showcasing the best of Nashville’s emerging artists.
    With the release of the EP, Ten Gun Salute, Diaz began receiving some encouraging exposure, touring with The Civil Wars and Landon Pigg, garnering favorable press in Paste (who dubbed her one of the “Top Ten Buzziest Acts” at SXSW 2009) AOL’s Spinner and on NPR, as well as and having her songs licensed for ABC Family’s Pretty Little Liars and Lifetime’s Drop Dead Diva and Army Wives.
    Plastic Moon initially began as a self-produced project. Diaz and Ryan gathered up “60 or 70” songs in progress and started paring them down, looking for a collection that held together as a singular work. At the same time, producer John Alagia (Dave Matthews Band, John Mayer, Liz Phair) was seeking his next project and connected with the pair, who then decamped for Dave Matthews’ palatial studio near Charlottesville, Virginia. The result departs from Diaz’s early rootsier side, though the record is no less heartfelt and arguably even more so with its poignant melodies and inventive arrangements.
    “It’s funny,” says Diaz, “we moved to Nashville and moved out of the alt-country box.”
    After years of perfecting her craft, it’s no surprise that the album boasts uniformly strong songwriting, ranging from the power-pop bounce of “Nothing At All” and the unshakably inviting “Let’s Go,” to the soaring, introspective majesty of “Heavy Heart.” Diaz’s pure, effortless voice and unerring sense of song craft shine throughout. Thanks to Alagia’s meticulous and sympathetic production, the music keeps Diaz’s indie spirit intact while bringing forth a more sophisticated soundscape, with everything from Fender Rhodes to marimba popping up in the mix. The strength of the record was enough to land a deal with tinyOGRE for Diaz, meaning that she may not remain Nashville’s best-kept secret for much longer.
    “Hopefully the next few years are going to be terrifyingly busy,” Diaz says, her voice excitedly rising. “I don’t want to rest on my laurels. I have had people say to both of us, ‘You’ve done so much; aren’t you ever going to be happy?’ I think that’s such a silly thing to say. Of course we’re never going to stop.”

    Artists
    Madi Diaz’s captivating, high-energy songs manage to conjure...


    Type Band, Official
    Hashtag #sxsw #MadiDiaz
    Tags 21+, Singer-Songwriter
    Website http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_MS18257


9:00pm

Trixie Whitley
    Thursday March 15, 2012 9:00pm - 9:40pm @ Cedar Street Courtyard (208 W 4th St)
    Trixie Whitley delivers emotionally compelling, heart-on-her-sleeve songs fueled by a passionate honesty and her searing guitar and piano. Her magnetic presence and stunning voice captivated audiences worldwide in 2011 as she performed with Daniel Lanois' Black Dub. Daughter of the legendary guitarist/singer Chris Whitley, Trixie has recorded three EP’s of her own music – including the newly-released Live at Rockwood Music Hall, recorded this past fall. She is currently in the studio finishing her full length debut release, which is due later in 2012.

    Artists
    Trixie Whitley delivers emotionally compelling, heart-on-her-sleeve...


    Type Band, Official
    Hashtag #sxsw #TrixieWhitley
    Tags 21+, Rock
    Website http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_MS17921


10:00pm

Nikki Lane

11:00pm

Brendan Benson

12:00am

Trampled by Turtles

1:00am

Van Hunt

11:00am

Filter Magazine's Showdown at Cedar Street

11:00am

Filter’s Showdown at Cedar St.

8:00pm

Zambri

9:00pm

Thomas Dolby
    Friday March 16, 2012 9:00pm - 9:40pm @ Cedar Street Courtyard (208 W 4th St)

    Thomas Dolby was an indelible part of the electronic music landscape on both sides of the Atlantic in the ’80s. The Zelig of synthpop, he was seemingly there or thereabouts at all points of that crucial decade. He enjoyed huge solo success with the singles “She Blinded Me With Science” and “Hyperactive!”, composed and performed on hits for everyone from AOR giants Foreigner to none-more-quirky new wave girl Lene Lovich, produced three superlative albums for Prefab Sprout, and even co-wrote the much-sampled early rap classic “Magic’s Wand” by Whodini.

    Artists
    Thomas Dolby was an indelible part of the electronic music landscape...


    Type Band, Official
    Hashtag #sxsw #ThomasDolby
    Tags 21+, Electronic
    Website http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_MS18391


10:00pm

Scoundrels

11:00pm

Salim Nourallah
    Friday March 16, 2012 11:00pm - 11:40pm @ Cedar Street Courtyard (208 W 4th St)

    If a Beatle was left in the desert at age 3 and raised in El Paso - you might have Salim Nourallah...Nourallah is a North Texas music scene fixture. After gaining initial acclaim with the Denton-based Nourallah Brothers he has gone on to release several solo albums and produce an impressive list of many others (including the Old 97s, Rhett Miller, Deathray Davies, Carter Albrecht & Smile Smile). His solo debut, Polaroid (2004), was met with reviews like this one: "discovering a singer-songwriter who can stop time is rare, but Salim Nourallah is such a find..." (Rolling Stone). Beautiful Noise followed in 2006 to more critical acclaim and he swept the Dallas Observer music awards with Best Album/Best Song and Best Producer. Salim has since gone on to win 6 consecutive Observer Awards for Best Producer. His 5th solo cd, Hit Parade, is slated for release in April 2012 by the German indie label, Tapete Records. Another European tour will coincide in July...

    Artists
    If a Beatle was left in the desert at age 3 and raised in El...


    Type Band, Official
    Tags 21+, Singer-Songwriter
    Website http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_MS19656


12:00am

1:00am

Jesse Malin
    Saturday March 17, 2012 1:00am - 1:50am @ Cedar Street Courtyard (208 W 4th St)
    From his days fronting seminal hardcore trio Heart Attack and infamous glam punks D Generation to nine years on the road as a solo artist and with his band, The St. Marks Social, Malin has cultivated a devout fan base. He has shared stages with everyone from Ryan Adams to Counting Crows, The Hold Steady to Lucinda Williams. His songs are filled with messengers and misanthropes, hopefuls and hypocrites-and as always, his constant themes of redemption, nightlife, heartbreak, and survival. With the critically acclaimed 2009 release of LOVE IT TO LIFE, Jesse Malin is now back in the studio with the St. Marks Social ready to deliver a refreshing new album.

    Artists
    Born in Queens, New York, Jesse Malin’s passion for music began...


    Type Band, Official
    Hashtag #sxsw #JesseMalin
    Tags 21+, Singer-Songwriter
    Website http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_MS17630


11:00am

Filter’s Showdown at Cedar St.

8:00pm

Star & Micey

9:00pm

Glossary
    Saturday March 17, 2012 9:00pm - 9:40pm @ Cedar Street Courtyard (208 W 4th St)

    From Marc Savlov, The Austin Chronicle:

    Cedar Street's substreet courtyard is the perfect venue for this annual hell-raisin' picnic, which mixes its namesake's Memphis guitar skronk with such brethren acts as Tennessee revivalists Star & Micey's stripped-down stomp 'n' holler. Follow that with a straight shot of the Kneiser sibs' soaring harmonies, and you've got Glossary's anthemic "Long Live All of Us." Can we get an amen? "Hell yes," sayeth Baltimore badasses J Roddy Walston & the Business, dive-bar sinner-saints with raw, red roadhouse heart to spare. William Elliott Whitmore's cracked and crackling vox and sorrowful solo guitar recall the Iowan lands he hails from. Hot Water Music's former punk-rock balladeer Chuck Ragan returns with glorious new album Covering Ground (SideOneDummy), right before this shindig picks it all up, sets it alight, and goes off with a Lucero-sized bang. The longtime rockers drop new LP Women & Work this very week, which, alongside Ben Nichols' trademark raggedy man yowl and Brian Venable's alt.country-punk gee-tar, sort of sums up all of SXSW, doncha think? Amen to that.



    Artists
    The phrase “Long Live All of Us” is the title of Glossary’s...


    Type Band, Official
    Hashtag #sxsw #Glossary
    Info Y
    Tags AustinChronicle, Rock, Music
    Website http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_MS18958


10:00pm

J Roddy Walston And The Business

11:00pm

William Elliott Whitmore
    Saturday March 17, 2012 11:00pm - 11:30pm @ Cedar Street Courtyard (208 W 4th St)

    From Marc Savlov, The Austin Chronicle:

    Cedar Street's substreet courtyard is the perfect venue for this annual hell-raisin' picnic, which mixes its namesake's Memphis guitar skronk with such brethren acts as Tennessee revivalists Star & Micey's stripped-down stomp 'n' holler. Follow that with a straight shot of the Kneiser sibs' soaring harmonies, and you've got Glossary's anthemic "Long Live All of Us." Can we get an amen? "Hell yes," sayeth Baltimore badasses J Roddy Walston & the Business, dive-bar sinner-saints with raw, red roadhouse heart to spare. William Elliott Whitmore's cracked and crackling vox and sorrowful solo guitar recall the Iowan lands he hails from. Hot Water Music's former punk-rock balladeer Chuck Ragan returns with glorious new album Covering Ground (SideOneDummy), right before this shindig picks it all up, sets it alight, and goes off with a Lucero-sized bang. The longtime rockers drop new LP Women & Work this very week, which, alongside Ben Nichols' trademark raggedy man yowl and Brian Venable's alt.country-punk gee-tar, sort of sums up all of SXSW, doncha think? Amen to that.



    Artists
    William Elliott Whitmore | Field Songs | Anti- Records A man...


    Type Band, Official
    Hashtag #sxsw #WilliamElliottWhitmore
    Info Y
    Tags AustinChronicle, Folk, Music
    Website http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_MS17763


11:45pm

Chuck Ragan
    Saturday March 17, 2012 11:45pm - 12:15am @ Cedar Street Courtyard (208 W 4th St)

    From Marc Savlov, The Austin Chronicle:

    Cedar Street's substreet courtyard is the perfect venue for this annual hell-raisin' picnic, which mixes its namesake's Memphis guitar skronk with such brethren acts as Tennessee revivalists Star & Micey's stripped-down stomp 'n' holler. Follow that with a straight shot of the Kneiser sibs' soaring harmonies, and you've got Glossary's anthemic "Long Live All of Us." Can we get an amen? "Hell yes," sayeth Baltimore badasses J Roddy Walston & the Business, dive-bar sinner-saints with raw, red roadhouse heart to spare. William Elliott Whitmore's cracked and crackling vox and sorrowful solo guitar recall the Iowan lands he hails from. Hot Water Music's former punk-rock balladeer Chuck Ragan returns with glorious new album Covering Ground (SideOneDummy), right before this shindig picks it all up, sets it alight, and goes off with a Lucero-sized bang. The longtime rockers drop new LP Women & Work this very week, which, alongside Ben Nichols' trademark raggedy man yowl and Brian Venable's alt.country-punk gee-tar, sort of sums up all of SXSW, doncha think? Amen to that.



    Artists
    Simply put, they don’t make musicians like Chuck Ragan anymore...


    Type Band, Official
    Hashtag #sxsw #ChuckRagan
    Info Y
    Tags AustinChronicle, Folk, Music
    Website http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_MS17310


12:30am

Lucero
 

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