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Filter: Austin Convention Center (Room 11AB)
 

11:00am

Mentors - Artist Development

12:30pm

Mentors - Open Call 1

2:00pm

Mentors - Publicity

3:30pm

Mentors - Press & Bloggers

5:00pm

Mentors - Open Call 2
 
 

11:00am

Mentors - Legal

12:30pm

Mentors - Producers

2:00pm

Mentors - Sales & Acquisitions

3:30pm

Mentors - Open Call 3

5:00pm

Mentors - International
 
 

12:30pm

Mentors - Distribution 2: Narrative

2:00pm

Mentors - Open Call 4

3:30pm

Mentors - Production 1

5:00pm

Mentors - Production 2
 
 

11:00am

Mentors - Writers

12:30pm

Mentors - Filmmakers 1: Documentary

2:00pm

Mentors - Filmmakers 2: Narrative

3:30pm

Mentors - Programming 1: Narrative

5:00pm

Mentors - Programming 2: Documentary
 
 

11:00am

Digital Musicologists: Online Music's Tastemakers

    From the Austin Chronicle:

    In a world where bands teem like bacteria, how does anyone tap into the real goods? You look to digital musicologists. They're behind a large portion of the music content on the Web. Suggestions you see on music sites ("If you like Van Halen, here are five other bands you may enjoy") aren't just computer-code magic. That's actually the work of music writers.

    "Music is something that is used socially," says Chuck Eddy, celebrated music critic, new Austinite as of last year, and current musicologist for Rhapsody. "Humans have a much wider scope of knowledge than computers, and digital musicologists are providing a service. I find it kind of exciting that if I plug in albums, the next day someone clicks on something I put in there and discovers new music."

    The job entails a lot of different content creation, explains Eddy, "general metadata." Metadata?

    "Metadata is hard to define, but in this context, it includes band bios, album reviews, popular tracks, and similar artists. When I write, 'This band is similar to these other 10 bands,' the similarities might be artists they influence or related projects, some form of overlap," says Eddy. "Again, the idea of a digital musicologist is that people benefit from having an actual human being guide them to music they might like. This isn't some mathematical algorithm. You have to put bands in a context. Another part of metadata is placing artists in subgenres and even sub-subgenres. It takes human beings to do that."

    How does this affect the climate of music writing?

    "The definition of what I do as a freelance music critic has expanded in so many directions," muses Eddy. "Until a couple years ago, I was just a writer or an editor. Sometimes I miss writing 4,000-word reviews, but I have the short pieces down to an art form. It's almost like writing a haiku. How much information and opinion can you pack into 600 characters? I like figuring things out – like where does country rap come from? Making connections is always what I've done."



    Speakers

    Writer | Chuck Eddy, a native of Detroit and graduate of the...

    Editor-in-Chief | eMusic

    Mgr of Curation | Pandora | Michael “Addi” Addicott is the...

    Sr Editor, Pop Music | All Music Guide/Rovi


    Type Music, Solo
    Hashtag #sxsw #tastemaker
    Level Beginner
    Info Y
    Tags AustinChronicle, Hip-Hop-Rap
    Website http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_MP13494


12:30pm

The Musician's Survival Guide

2:00pm

Confessions of a Dynamic Pricing Vendor

3:30pm

Creating a Scene in 2012

5:00pm

ATM In Your Pocket
 
 

1:30pm

How Stella Got Her Masters Back: Reversion Rights

    From the Austin Chronicle:

    Whether you're going through divorce, disease, or despair, Gloria Gaynor's worldwide disco smash "I Will Survive" is a triumphant anthem for all adversities. The song, written by Freddie Perren and Dino Fekaris, recently became one of 25 recordings inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame for 2012.

    "It's still popular, it's still being played, and the record company is still making lots of money on that record, very little of which I am getting," says Gaynor.

    That may soon change thanks to a provision in the 1976 Copyright Act that took effect in 1978, the year "I Will Survive" was released. Under the act, artists like Gaynor can reclaim ownership of their post-1977 master recordings after 35 years. That makes 2013 something of a zero hour in the music industry.

    The issue of reversion rights still brings up more questions than answers. Congress didn't specify who constitutes an author of a sound recording, and the already reeling major labels aren't going to give up their lucrative back catalogs without a fight. The Recording Industry Association of America, which lobbies on behalf of labels, has argued that most recordings are works for hire and are therefore not subject to reversion.

    Gaynor, who will provide her decidedly different take on the matter as a South by Southwest panelist, thinks Congress needs to step back in to protect artists' rights.

    "We need to convince them that a recording is not a work for hire," she asserts. "The artist doesn't sing a song and then walk away, which is what a work for hire is.

    "We're constantly out there promoting. If I hadn't been there singing 'I Will Survive' around the world and if I hadn't recorded it in the first place, it would not be constantly played and it would not be making money for the record companies. It makes absolutely no sense whatsoever that I should be making a pittance from it while the record company makes all this money just because they put up the initial money."

    Although Gaynor has not filed to reclaim ownership of her own master recordings, calling it "premature," her animosity toward labels isn't hard to discern.

    "I see it as the record company having had their hands in the cookie jar for many, many years and now we're asking them to take it out," she says. "They see it as a loss. I see it as termination of a theft."



    Speakers
    Chief Advocacy & Industry Rel Officer | The Recording Academy...

    Partner | Mitchell Silberberg & Knupp LLP | Eric J. German is...

    GLOLO LLC | She was 19 when she signed her first record contract...

    Atty | Lommen Abdo Cole King & Stageberg PA | Ken Abdo is Chair...


    Type Music, Panel
    Hashtag #sxsw #reversion
    Level Intermediate
    Info Y
    Tags Alt Country, AustinChronicle
    Website http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_MP9606


2:45pm

Seeing Red: Aesthetics and Visuals of Metal

4:00pm

Success Strategies for the UK

5:15pm

Reaching Today's Digital Music Consumers
 
 

12:30pm

Has Digital Music Made Indie Labels Go Mainstream?
    Cloud-based streaming music providers have changed the way digital music is being consumed, and indie record labels are cashing in. Label executives are negotiating aggressively to make sure they profit from the shift to the cloud, where service providers are designing desirable services for a global audience, and giving artists increased access to new fans. The digital music space has enjoyed an explosion of options in recent months - some with "the big four" label support, some without - all with varying types of subscription models, technology investment and device capabilities. Hear about the strategies for these new business models, and how collaboration helps artists reach new fans around the world, offering independent labels increased exposure without sacrificing independence.

    Speakers
    Director, Music Services | Sony Network Entertainment | Anu Kirk...

    CEO | Omnifone | Jeff Hughes is responsible for the global expansion...

    West Coast Editor | The Business Insider | Matt Rosoff is the...

    Pres | Sony Network Entertainment | TIMOTHY SCHAAFF President...


    Type Music, Panel
    Hashtag #sxsw #indielab
    Level Intermediate
    Tags Hip-Hop-Rap
    Website http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_MP9233


2:00pm

The Unspoken Code of the Music Blogosphere

3:30pm

Music Biz Models: What Works & What Doesn't
    Anyone can create a business and develop a music service. The technology is available and the royalty rates and content laws are relatively straightforward. But how can entrepreneurs cut through the noise and actually create, maintain AND profit from a business based on music (without alienating listeners)? Who should music lovers turn to for reliable content and services? Pre-internet era business models revolved around selling advertising to provide the content to consumers for little to no cost. In today’s mobile and connected environment, consumers have access to almost everything at anytime for close to no cost at all - so content creators have to get creative with business models. Subscription-based services are popular today, but is that the answer?

    Speakers
    Pres & CEO | Slacker Inc


    Type Music, Solo
    Hashtag #sxsw #bizmodels
    Level Intermediate
    Tags Hip-Hop-Rap
    Website http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_MP12919


 

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